Writing Update, Free Ebook

I released Bonds That Bind late last year. It took time for me to realize it but my release of the book was contrary to what I stand for. To remedy this, I am now giving my collection Bonds that Bind for free here on Writings By Ender. If you enjoy it and want to support my writing, you can still by the book but I want to make it accessible to everyone. https://writingbyender.files.wordpress.com/2016/10/bonds-that-bind.pdf This is the link. No strings attached, straight-to-download. If you wish to support me and my writing after reading the book, you can buy it on Amazon here(reviews are nice too): https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M5BIGM7

Link for readers in the UK : https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B01M5BIGM7/

Thank you for your time! 

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Child of God, a Book Review

Review

At times funny and charming and most other times out right haunting, Child of God is another excellent work by the renown writer Cormac McCarthy. The book centers on Lester Ballard who is largely disliked by the community at large. Lester has a few friends but they are never quite treated as such but rather as a means to achieve something else. The book centers on disturbing themes such as pedophilia and necrophilia and is base loosely on real life events.

As always McCarthy’s style is minimalist and completely removed of any excess in terms of grammar and punctuation. In reading McCarthy a reader will come to realize the amount of waste that comes in reading other writers. Hemingway’s influence on McCarthy largely apparent in this case and in some ways, McCarthy provides more direct impact.

The scenes within the book unfold more or less linearly but don’t all directly relate to the plot. Some scenes only serve the purpose of providing context to thing to come or in characterization of Lester Ballard. Having the book played out this way is effective when it comes to an overall picture but it is not difficult for one to get lost or to determine the purpose of these scenes.

Overall Child of God is a strong novel with highly adult and disturbing things that will not be suitable for all readers. Those who had trouble going through Nabokov’s Lolita, will find similar, if not worse, trouble getting through this novel. If you can stomach these distressing themes, then you will find an excellent read with Child of God

Quotes

“To watch these things issuing from the otherwise mute pastoral morning is a man at the barn door. He is small, unclean, unshaven. He moves in the dry chaff among the dust and slats of sunlight with a constrained truculence. Saxon and Celtic bloods. A child of God much like yourself perhaps.”

“Bowing, pointing, smiling. The microphone in one hand. Among the pines on the ridge the sound of the auctioneer’s voice echoed muted, redundant. An illusion of multiple voices, a ghost chorus among old ruins.”

“Old woods and deep. At one time in the world there were woods that no one owned and these were like them.”

Writing Tip: 3 Steps to Deeper Creativity

*This was pulled from my post on Millionaire Digest*

When one pictures creativity the stereotype is often an artist or writer. Though these professions have creativity in common, they aren’t the only ones who can take advantage of this skill (pay special note to skill, rather than talent). People in business, lawyers, mathematicians, scientists, doctors and many others can reap the major benefits of creativity. After all, creativity is simply the ability to think outside of the box, and the ability to combine dissimilar thoughts. When expressed this way, the inherent importance of creativity is near-palpable. This article serves as a guide to deepening, or even jump-starting, your creativity.

Step One: Change Your Mindset

Echoing back to calling creativity a skill, it is imperative that you alter your mindset. Creativity is more than an innate talent. It is an all-together achievable skill you can hone. People have come to accept that experts who are adept in a certain field have some unattainable talent. There is a book that addresses just that called The Talent Code. It helps dispel many false ideas about talent.

Hard work is required but it’s only through effort that you can develop skill and proficiency. View creativity as an attainable skill, one that takes work but can be refined through substantial play as well.

Step Two: Consume Creative Ideas

A pretty logical step, but one that’s often breezed by. It’s important that you devour creative thoughts. Creativity demands a frame of reference. You need to know what has been done and what hasn’t. You need a decent understanding of your field as well as other fields to integrate them into a holistically unique product. This is one of the goals of creativity. Creatives are all putting out a product of some sort: Writing, art, music, an eloquent speech, an invention or a business proposal.

A writer should not only read a lot but study other subjects deeply as well. Likewise to the businessman, who should comprehend both the business in which they operate and beyond.

The type of consumption I’m suggesting isn’t a shallow reading. What I’m suggesting within your consumption of creative ideas, is to weave a spider web. Learning something new doesn’t help if it doesn’t tie to something relevant in your own web. So when you learn something, find ways to connect it to what you already know and do it in ways beyond your first thought.

Step Three: Produce and Seek Feedback

Creativity is thought and the purpose of thought is action. It would be wasteful to have gotten to step two without reaching out to this step. Luckily, this step is the easiest to understand. In whatever way you deem fit for yourself, it is now time to create. Write, paint, invent, innovate, whatever it takes to synthesize the creative ideas you’ve been absorbing.

But don’t stop there! Feedback completes the cycle. Learn what works and what’s broken about the creative ideas you presented. Opening yourself to feedback is often terrifying but you’ll soon see how vital it becomes. It will lead to a period of growth you’ve thought unattainable

Writing Prompt: Hitchhiker

Scene: Your two main characters are travelling cross county on vacation. It’s early morning and the sun has barely broken over the horizon. On the side of the road your protagonist notices a ragged old man on the side of the street. For an unknown reason you are compelled to pick up this stranger.

I’m setting this up for a thriller/horror type story but serious props will go to those who skirt away from that cliche and try to take it another way. As usual, the winners and participants will be listed this Saturday.

Happy writing.

Roles of a Writer: The Advertiser

Advertisers are the image presenters of the company. They ensure the company’s brand has an overall cohesiveness, and more than that, actively try to draw customers to invest in the product. As such there are lessons for writers to learn from advertisers this article will limit those lessons to submitting work, advertising with social media, and seeking business opportunities.

Submitting Your Work

It shouldn’t be a surprise to more experienced writers but submitting your work to publishers is advertisement. When you send your work to a publisher they are evaluating your product (the submission) and determining whether they should invest in the product. Therefore submitting a work requires a keen self-awareness. Writers should learn how to put their best foot forward in correspondence with those publishers by writing concise and professional emails or being cordial in verbal conversation. Neither “concise” nor “professional” imply impersonal; it is important to keep the elements which make up your personality as a writer. For writers, personality can be a major selling point.

Social Media

Many writers would disagree but you should advertise your work on social media. A published writer doesn’t have to deal with this sort of thing, in fact most of this role is put in another’s hands upon publication, but an independent or unpublished writer needs to heed this carefully. Social media is a tool that can help you present the best image of yourself possible. Be intelligent with your use of social media.

Advertising via social media is a difficult task but it is necessary if you hope to garner any attention. The advertiser knows works will go unnoticed whether or not they’re advertised but they do it anyway knowing that something will catch the audience. The advertiser is persistent in their pursuit in elevating the brand of the independent writer.

 Writing Opportunities

Unfortunately finding an opportunity for writing is quite difficult and requires a bit of persistence. The purpose of the advertiser in finding writing opportunities is to market yourself out to the company(s) you wish to work with. Do you read a publishing company you’d like to work with? Or maybe magazine you enjoy reading has an opening for a writer? You’ve got to show them your interest and the traits you have that the company would need. No two writers have exactly the same skill set, so use that to your advantage.

The advertiser is an underestimated role because it takes place after the fact of writing your story/novel/etc. This doesn’t make it any less important than writing. Without a somewhat developed advertiser role no one will read what you write. Or else you’d be leaving it to the whims of the unpredictable world for something to land on your table.